SYLLABUS EXAMPLE -- INTERNET COURSE


Shown below is a several-page, complete, and detailed course syllabus. Although it is a syllabus for a particular occupational course, the format can be adapted to probably many other Internet courses as well. At the right of the syllabus is a section-by-section explanation, including comments based on use of this format over a couple of years. The syllabus should be presented the first day. For a similar syllabus for a classroom course, see "Syllabus Example -- Classroom Course."

The syllabus here reflects John Doe's philosophy and teaching experience, which a syllabus should do (see the introduction). Other instructors may have very different ideas about course structure and policies. The syllabus is posted here principally to represent an Internet syllabus format. Because Internet instructors do not meet students in a classroom and discuss syllabi face-to-face with students as presentationsof them are made, Internet syllabi need to be longer than their classrooom equivalents. John suggests that Internet instructors devote the entire first online class to the syllabus and getting acquainted.




DRAFT 126
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS


COURSE SYLLABUS

FALL, 1998

INSTRUCTOR: JOHN DOE




Course alpha, number, and title. Document title. Some or all of this information you might want to place in a (graphical) page banner.
WELCOME TO CLASS
Welcome to class -- and thanks for signing up for this online course. For many of you, this may be your first online (on the Internet) course, so we'll use the entire class today to discuss the course, get acquainted with a few simple computer operations, and poke around a little to see how things will work. If you are not a computer wiz, don't worry -- you won't need to be. From a computer standpoint, absolutely everything is simple. By the time you leave class today, you'll know almost everything needed to navigate this course on the Internet.




A short, simple welcome to the class.
A. WHY THE ONLINE FORMAT?
Before getting into the organizational details and topics of the course, if you might be wondering why the course is presented online in the first place, I have some comments on another page. Click here for those comments about the online format.

One advantage of the online format is the ability to include a lot of graphic images -- over a thousand in all -- plus video clips. Hopefully they will make the subject more interesting and the material easier to understand. And you won't have to pass them on to someone sitting next to you or strain to see them on a screen at the front of a room -- they'll be right in front of you, to spend time studing, to keep, print, or whatever you choose. Aloha Tower Most of the photos were taken right here in Hawaii, so the course should incidentally be something of a tour of materials, building construction, and design in and around Honolulu. If you live on the island of Oahu, I suspect that you will recognize many of the photos, and maybe you will see in them things you hadn't noticed before. You can read about materials and construction in a textbook, but the photos and explanations should make it mean more by showing that it's all happening right here. During the course, I hope you will develop an appreciation for our built environment in Hawaii. If you take from the course what I hope you do, there will probably be certain buildings and other things you will see even years from now and be reminded of this course and what you learned about them here.

Check out my favorite drawing and photo images presented in the course. There is also a much larger index of photos.

Another useful resource in the course is a directory of construction materials references that contains links to sites related to the topics of the course.



John has simply decided to address this issue right away and set the stage for a course that is not simply an alternative to a classroom course, but one that is the best that it can be partly because of the online format. Students should understand the format to be an advantage of the course, not a hindrance. Links to other pages are included partly to get students used to jumping to other pages for needed information, then returning to the start page.

B. PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION
This is a no-prerequisite first course in construction materials and one of the first regular-program courses in the Drafting Technology program at Honolulu Community College. Although it is required for HCC Drafting Technology students, it is open to anyone who might be interested. No part of the course is directed specifically at drafting technology students. Reading, research and construction projects, and collaboration with the class are major components of the course. Although the course bears the "DRAFT" alpha, it is not a drawing course.

The course is a three-credit course that on campus would require five hours of in-class work and maybe about three hours outside of class on study and other activities each week over a 16-week semester. Students taking the course online should plan on spending up to the same eight hours a week on the course. Competencies will be listed for each class.

The course follows the CSI (Construction Specifications Institute) format that arranges the material into 16 divisions -- concrete, masonry, metals, wood and plastics, furnishings, mechanical systems, etc. This works quite well because the course is about 16 weeks long. We will spend much more time on some divisions than others, but it means on average about one week per topic.



The course -- what it is and how it fits into a program or supports other courses, needs, etc. The structure of the course, and why this structure.
C. COURSE OBJECTIVES
  1. To acquaint students with the types, properties, uses, and variety of materials important in construction.
  2. To acquaint students with common building methods and practices involving those materials.
  3. To acquaint students with building and general construction products and their associated quality, durability, warrantees, and availability.
  4. To familiarize students with the local (and national) built environment and to promote a greater appreciation of it.
  5. To provide students with hands-on, research, and collaborative activities to vary and deepen the study of construction materials.


Five or six general, overall objectives of the course. These might be stated in the form of "behavioral" or "performance" objectives, but John has reserved that format for class and activity objectives that are more specific, differentiated, and quantifiable.
D. COURSE TOPICS IN THE CSI FORMAT
NOTE: The topics have been rearranged to correlate with work on a required construction project (explained "in class" next time). This is why the divisions are out of order.
  • CONCRETE (Division 3)
  • SITE WORK (Division 2)
  • MASONRY (Division 4)
  • WOOD (Division 6, Part I)
  • METALS (Division 5)
  • GENERAL REQUIREMENTS (Division 1)
  • PLASTICS (Division 6, Part II)
  • SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION (Division 13)
  • SPECIALTIES (Division 10)
  • DOORS, WINDOWS, AND GLASS (Division 8)
  • FURNISHINGS (Division 12)
  • EQUIPMENT (Division 11)
  • THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION (Division 7)
  • CONVEYING SYSTEMS (Division 14)
  • FINISHES (Division 9)
  • MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (Division 15)
  • ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS (Division 16)


The units or topics of study. It shows the progression of topics and evidences your pre-course planning.

E. TEXTBOOK AND REQUIRED SUPPLIES
  1. Optional textbook: Construction Materials and Processes, latest edition, by Donald Watson.
  2. Supplies (for the building construction project):


Very important. Students need to know right away what materials they need and much the course will cost them.

F. A NOTE ABOUT YOU AND THIS COURSE
Students learn best in quite different ways. One of the advantages of the online format of the course is that it allows students to approach the course in ways that suit their personal styles and preferences. In classrooms, instructors are inclined to teach either as they themselves were taught, or as they think "the average student" prefers. Online, all of the instructor-presented class material is laid out at once, and students can do with it whatever they prefer in order to learn in as personal and unique a fashion as possible.

To understand how you might learn best and how you might approach the course, it's suggested that you complete a learning style inventory, use the information given to figure and interpret your score, and plan your learning strategy accordingly. Another couple of online tools of this sort are the Keirsey Temperament Questionnaire and the Keirsey Character Questionnaire.

This course by design specifically accommodates different learning styles by involving a variety of components, including text, a wealth of photos and drawings, video clips, self-check quizzes, reference lists, online discussion, and a construction project. Since you are probably used to learning more or less as prescribed or required by a classroom teacher and are not used to designing your own learning strategy, it might take a little time to do that and to settle into a comfortable routine. I think you'll find that as you figure out on your own (and with the help of the online questionnaires mentioned) how to learn the material, everything will fall into place.

Online learning, you will find, is quite different than classroom learning. It requires different attitudes, responsibilities, and communication skills. To help you prepare for this different learning environment (for most students), you might want to take a FREE online preparatory course (a short online course about taking online courses -- sound a little strange?). Click the address here:

http://www.esocrates.com/cgi-bin/socrates.cgi?learn001


How students learn, how they approach the course material, and how they manage their time and motivate themselves are particularly important in online courses. In classroom courses, approaches, meeting times, attendance, etc. are structured and overseen by the instructors. But in online courses, a lot of responsibility falls on students individually and personally -- and typically many students are not trained or prepared for this responsibility. John believes that online instructors need to help students with this, and the help, he has learned, is most appropriately provided as early as possible.

G. CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR
E-Mail (best way) johndoe@hcc.hawaii.edu (school)
johndoe@aol.com (weekends, holidays)
Page Buttons There is an e-mail button in a banner at the top of each class page (activated at the very end of this class) for sending questions and comments.
Office Phone (808) 000-0000, (leave a message after six rings; please speak loud enough and clearly)
In Person Office Hrs: 9:30-10:30 MWF, 12:30-1:30 TT
Office Loc: Building 2, Room 613 (see the campus map)
In Chat Weekly times will be arranged. Click on the "chat" button in the banner at any class page.
Program Web Pages http://www.honolulu.hawaii.edu/instruct/div6/drafting
Instructor Web Pages http://home.honolulu.hawaii.edu/~johndoe
http://members.aol.com/johndoe


The ability to contact instructors is very important for students taking online courses. Since they cannot ask questions in a classroom, catch an instructor right before or after a class, and often not take advantage of real office hours, online instructors, John believes, need to be pay special attention to being reachable and to letting students know how they can be contacted.

H. CONTACT CLASSMATES
In a banner at the top of each class page (after the information has been compiled) there will be a button entitled "classmates" that you can click for the names, e-mail addresses, one-line biographies, and (optional) web page addresses of everyone in the class. If you want your picture and/or additional biographical information to be available to other students, you can include that on your personal home page.

At the top of each class page (activated at the very end of this class) there will also be a button entitled "collaborate" that will enable you to communicate with the entire class and with scheduled outside experts and guests. Part of your grade will be based on your using this regularly (see "collaboration" under the heading "Course Activities" below).



Since online students do not physically meet, special provisions need to be made for them to learn who else is in the class and how to meet those other students in cyberspace as needed or desired.

I. COURSE ACTIVITIES
Icon 1. READING
Most of the required reading will be reading of material posted on the web (like this) for each class. Reading in the textbook is recommended for every topic studied. The material I present will seldom duplicate what's presented in the textbook, so the textbook should be used as a reinforcement or complement to in-class material. The suggested textbook readings are listed in the schedule that follows. It is best if you do the reading in the textbook before the dates shown.

INTERESTING FACT: In almost every class there is one or more "interesting fact" (short, red text, etc. something like this) that is included for fun and interest only. You will never be tested on "interesting facts," and you can simply bypass them if you want. They are often surprising, weird, or obscure facts, but they are all true.

Video clips are incorporated into online material that you will need to read. To view the clips, you will need to download a free video player. The download is very simple, however. Go to Vivo Player by clicking the Vivo image below. Enter (1) your computer operating system (probably Windows 95, but check the drop-down list for other possibilities), (2) your browser type (Internet Explorer or Netscape), and (3) your first name, last name, and e-mail address. Scroll down that page and click "submit." At the next screen that comes up, answer "yes." If you see a message indicating that you will not be able to hear any audio because you do not have an audio device in your computer, that's OK -- the video clips to view will not have audio anyway. So if that message comes up, answer "no." That's all there is to it.


CLICK THIS IMAGE TO DOWNLOAD THE VIDEO PLAYER REQUIRED TO VIEW THE VIDEO CLIPS

The video clips are best viewed on Netscape. On Internet Explorer they will likely stop playing before the end (i.e., they will be cut short at the end). For more information, click here.

Icon 2. DAILY SELF-CHECK QUIZZES
Ungraded quizzes for testing yourself on class explanations and other activities will be available at all classes except those following a construction project activity and after exam classes. Answers and explanations will be shown on a linked page, so you can check your answers immediately after taking the quizzes. Exactly how you use the quizzes, as well as simply choosing whether or not to use them at all, will be up to you. For them to have the greatest effect, however, you should take them just like in-class quizzes, then check your answers. The quizzes should give you a good idea about how well you are learning the material -- and the explanations of the answers will often contain new material that will help you learn. The self-check quizzes are almost entirely multiple choice, but about half of each major exam will be short essay (discuss, compare, explain, etc.). The multiple choice items will simply enable you to check your answers immediately. For possible subjects of essay questions, you should look more at the class objectives (the "objectives" button in the banner at the top of each page).

Icon 3. ON-CAMPUS INTERIM EXAMS
There will be two interim exams -- one on Saturday, February 20 at 8:00am, the other on Saturday, April 10 at 8:00am. They will be given in Room 615 in Building 2. For the building location on campus, you can check the campus map. Students will be admitted to the exams up to 8:30am. Bring a picture ID (nobody admitted without proper identification). More about the exams closer to the test dates.

If you are an off-island or out-of-state student, you may take any or all of the exams at a school in your area provided that (1) a school instructor, administrator, counselor, or regularly-employed testing lab official administers the exam, (2) the participation of that person is arranged by you, (3) the name, phone number, position, etc. of that person is e-mailed to me no later than two weeks prior to the scheduled exam date(s), and (4) any such exam is taken one day prior to the exam date(s) shown on the schedule that follows if the testing place is not open on Saturdays. Any project that is due must be mailed or delivered to me by the due date (post marked by that date in the case of mailing).

Icon 4. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT
There is a construction project that will run approximately two-thirds of the semester. We'll devote on average every fourth class period to working on it. Each day (whenever it's scheduled), I'll give you instructions for completing a part of the project. It will be a small model of a building section similar to these:

Two Student ProjectsModel of Koa Wood
Model by Kesha Lee (left) features unique door and window designs and a realistic foundation. Model by Nathan Jucutan (middle) has a real concrete foundation. Model by Derrick Lee (right) has mostly Koa wood parts and a number of added features -- right down to a mouse in the crawl space below the floor.

These models are 9" x 12" and stand about 18" high. The bases are plywood, most of the foundations are "Styrofoam," the framing is out of "Foamcor" board, and the flooring, siding, door, and roof sheathing are out of illustration board.

The purposes of the project are to (1) learn basic building construction and how building components go together, (2) involve you in work with a few of the materials studied, (3) get you into a store where the materials are sold, (4) provide experiences in working precisely, to scale, and according to specific directions on a three-dimensional project (which will aid you in later drafting courses), and (5) provide a change of pace from reading and quiet hands-off participation. Along with simple instructions on how to construct the model, there will be information and photos on actual building construction. The project will be due on the morning of the second interim exam as shown in the schedule that follows -- and as you'll be reminded prior to the due date.

Icon 5. KITCHEN DESIGN EXERCISE
There will be one kitchen design project assigned in the course. You will need to print a web page that shows the plan, design a kitchen for it, and mail or deliver the completed plan to me.

Icon 6. ELECTRICAL PLAN
At the second test on Saturday, April 10th, you'll receive a large floor plan to save until later in the course when we cover electrical systems (Division 16). You'll need to complete the plan with electrical wiring symbols, an electrical schedule, and a load computation. Since you will not draft the plan itself, no special drafting equipment will be required. The completed plan will be due on the morning of the final exam.

Icon 7. RESEARCH PROJECT
There will be a required research project. Each student will research a different topic. More about this in a week or two.

Icon 8. E-MAIL AND COLLABORATION
Part of your grade will be based on your collaborating with the class online at least once each week. There will be a "collaboration" button in the banner at the top of each class page. Use it like you would to send an e-mail message to an individual. I will follow your discussions, but I may not actively participate. As much as possible, I want it to be your forum. I would prefer not to influence its direction or make my presence too obvious. I will, however, follow up on discussion topics as needed or desired at the beginning of the next class sessions. A feature of this discussion forum is that outside experts and guests will be able to participate from time to time. So do not be surprised if you receive a response or other message from someone who is an expert or otherwise has first hand knowledge of a particular topic. I'll try to keep you informed about who the outsiders are.

Icon 9. FINAL EXAM
The final exam will be given on Saturday, May 8, at 8:30am in Room 615, Building 2 on the main campus. The format will be similar to that of the interim tests -- about half multiple choice, about half short essay. The exam will be comprehensive, but a slight emphasis will be on material covered since the last interim exam. Your grade will be posted on the web along with your final grade in the course. More information about the final exam closer to the exam date.



The principal components of the course innumerated and explained.

The self-check quizzes are simply provided for practice, but advantage is taken of adding a little material or presenting it a little differently on the page where answers are given. The online format makes it very convenient for discussion at almost every correct and incorrect answer. Students do not read every explanation, but it is there for students who might wonder why a certain answer is correct or who need a little additional discussion of the topic. In a classroom there would simply not be the time to address almost every right and wrong answer.

The interim and final exams are proctored. At the present time there is simply no respectable alternative. Unproctored exams may be legitimate activities and be legitimately graded, but they are not "tests" in the truest sense of the term. It has also been learned that proctored exams work very well (even for distant students), and they are readily accepted by students -- especially by the better students who appreciate grades truly reflective of their achievement and whose grades are not "corrupted" by inflated grades received by those who take advantage of no supervision.

The construction project, design project, and electrical plan projects are designed primarily to accommodate a wider range of learning styles. The newsgroup discussion forum, the (recently instituted) chat forum, and the research project also help accommodate different learning styles and interests.

J. GRADES
Final grades will be based on the total number of points earned in the course. The table below are listed the activities and their point values.

RECAP AND WEIGHTING OF THE ACTIVITIES
ACTIVITY WEIGHT POINTS NOTE
Reading 0% 0 Not graded.
Self-Check Quizzes 0% 0 Not graded, but important practice for the exams.
Interim Exam #1 15% 75 75 items
Interim Exam #2 15% 75 75 items
Construction Project 15% 75 Eight components
Kitchen Design Exercise 3% 15 One component
Electrical Plan 7% 35 Three components
Research Project 10% 50
Online Collaboration 15% 75 Profile, plus 2-5 pts each of 15 wks
Chat 0% 0 Not graded (it's purely elective)
Final Exam 20% 100 100 items
TOTAL 100% 500 451-500 pts = A
401-450 pts = B
351-400 pts = C
301-350 pts = D
000-300 pts = F

By clicking the "status" button in the page banner, you will be able to see at any point in the course the number of points you have earned, the total number of points still available, etc. at that point in the course.

GENERAL GRADING POLICIES
Except in cases of actual error, final grades are permanent. The last day to withdraw from the course is Friday, October 16.

Final "I" grades will not be permitted except in cases of prolonged, continuous, and excused absences in the latter half of the course. Under no circumstances will an "I" grade be given when more than half of the coursework has not been completed.

Final "N" grades will be given only in very rare and exceptional cases. An "N" will never be given simply to replace a grade that you would prefer not to receive.




Very important and often administratively required. Students MUST know how their performance will be graded, and they must know this as early as possible. This is the place to "put it in writing" and ensure that everyone is clear about it from the start (students who enroll late should be required to review this online syllabus before proceeding further).

K. NAVIGATIONAL AIDS
These are the navigational aids you'll need to use to maneuver your way around class. This is what they are and what they do. You can click on the name of the item to see what it looks like.

ANSWERS Find answers to self-check quiz items.
BACK ONE PAGE Go back one page.
CHAT Online chat with other students. Instructor present at scheduled hours.
CLASSMATES List of student names, e-mail addresses, home page links, etc.
COLLABORATE Post questions and comments, respond to others, etc. for the entire class to view.
COMMENTS Send comments to instructor (similar to "Instructor").
CONTINUE Continue to the next page (NOT the end of the class).
HOME PAGE Return to the DRAFT 26 home page.
HOTLINKS Quick links to all classes.
INSTRUCTOR MAIL Send a question, comment, etc. to the instructor.
INSTRUCTOR PAGE Go to the instructor's web page.
NEXT CLASS Go on to the next class.
OBJECTIVES View the objectives (or "competencies") for the class.
REFERENCES Go to a list of references.
SCHEDULE Go to the daily schedule for the course at Class 1.
STATUS A record of grade points earned to date.
VIDEO View a video clip related to the text.


The navigational buttons are rather self-explanatory, and some students will learn what they are and what they do by simply experimenting with them. But other students will need a detailed explanation and demonstration, and this is the purpose of this section of the syllabus.
L. GETTING TO CLASS
I've set up a start page for you to go to every time you come to class. It's http://www.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/accesspg.htm To go to class, go directly to that page where there's a quick link to every class, click the class you want to attend, and, voila, you'll immediately be taken there. Try it now -- go to http://www.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/accesspg.htm, click "Cl. 1," and you'll be right back here.

Remember that you'll be able to go only to classes that met during the last couple of weeks and not classes either earlier than that, or later than the current date. The principal purpose of this is to keep the class roughly together so that everyone will be approximately together in newsgroup and chat discussions. So there is something of a two-week "window of opportunity" for attending each class. You might want to bookmark the class access page so you do not have to remember the address and type it in each time you go to a class.

If you lose track of the class numbers, you can always go back to the schedule that shows dates and topics as well as class numbers. That's here in the syllabus, and there's a link button entitled "schedule" under the banner at the top of each class page to make that super-easy.



Students need a quick and easy way of accessing classes. The two-week period for attending classes is (1) to keep students roughly together in newsgroup and chat discussions, (2) to prevent students from falling too far behind so they cannot participate effectively, and (3) to keep some students from speeding through the material and not getting enough out of the material and participate effectively in discussions.
M. TODAY'S ACTIVITY
I need some profile information from you. The past couple of semesters I've had students e-mail that to me. But I've decided to have you post it to HyperNews (via the "collaboration" button that I mentioned a while ago) to get you into using that. Also, it'll serve as something of an introduction of yourself to the class. This use of HyperNews will count as your required participation in HyperNews this week. If there is something else you'd like to ask or comment on in HyperNews this week, you can do that too. Remember that the once-a-week participation in collaboration is only a minimum.

Before you go to HyperNews (collaboration), however, you need to print or hand copy the questions that follow. When you go to HyperNews, this screen will disappear, so unless you have a photographic memory, you'll need to copy the questions here to refer to after you quit this screen. Anyway, these are the questions:

  1. What is your name?
  2. What is your major?
  3. What is your career objective?
  4. How many credits of coursework (not including this semester) do you have beyond high school?
  5. How many credits of coursework are you taking this semester?
  6. How many hours a week (if any) do you work at paid employment?
  7. What is the highest numbered English course you have taken and passed?
  8. Have you taken a course on the internet before this one?
  9. What is the most important reason why you are taking this course?
  10. At this point in time, what is your preference -- web courses, classroom courses, or no preference?
  11. What is the address of your personal home page?
  12. Is there anything else you'd like to comment on? If so, what?


Besides providing John with the personal information he wants, this activity requires students to use the newsgroup discussion forum. Earlier, to find the class access page, students (deliberately omitted from this syllabus) needed to e-mail John for the address of that class access page. The address is not super-secret, but not publishing it on the Internet (the syllabus can be viewed by anyone in the world) keeps visitors out of classes, discussions, etc. beyond today's presentation of the course syllabus.
N. BEFORE THE NEXT CLASS
  1. There is no required reading, but pages 50-76 are suggested. The discussion next time will make a little more sense if you have some background in the topics I address.

  2. Start rounding up materials for the construction project. You will need items 1, 3, 4, and 5 (or some other sharp thin knife to cut the 1" thick Styrofoam™) by the first construction project class (check the schedule).

  3. There will be a self-check quiz next time. If right now you took the quiz on Class 1 (this syllabus) that you're finishing now, how do you think you'd do? Do you remember the attendance policy? What are the requirements for collaborating online?


O. RELATED NATIONAL WEB SITES
Check these out for information related to a number of topics in the course and for links to other sites. Sites related to specific topics of the course are shown on class pages.
Architectural Resources and Communications (ARC)
Links to major product manufacturers, service providers, schools of architecture, etc.
Builder Online
Electronic cousin of Builder magazine.
Building Industry Exchange (BIX)
Links to construction-related companies, schools, etc.
Building Online.
Links to more than 104,000 building-related sites. Information, free samples, and more.
Building Product Library
AEC InfoCenter. Search for products and information in any of several ways, including the CSI format in which topics are arranged in this course.
First Source Online
Bills itself as "the most comprehensive product resource on the internet." 950 products, 3000 images.
Home Center News
News and analysis for the home improvement building material industry.
National Association of Home Builders
National Association of Women in Construction
National Building Museum
Permanent and temporary exhibitions, design and construction artifacts, tours of landmark buildings, publications, etc. Created by an act of Congress.
This Old House Magazine
Encyclopedia of projects, tools, and products, FAQ's, news, and links.
Building Materials by McGraw-Hill Sweets
Comprehensive construction resource guide. Easy-to-use table of contents.
Related Hawaii Web Sites:
Build-Net®
Hawaii Design, Repair and Construction Network. Links to Hawaii materials and construction companies.


Simply reference.

SCHEDULE
A daily or weekly schedule is not a required part of or required addendum to a syllabus. It does, however, help keep the course on track throughout a semester, help the instructor from "running out of time" at the end of a course, enable students to always see what is coming up, enable them to see where classes fit into the plan, and evidence good planning and organization. It also saves the instructor significant planning time during the course. It is particularly important for an Internet course, because of the different times students "attend" classes and the logistical problems caused by changing things or improvising "on the fly."
DATE DAY NO. TOPIC/ACTIVITY SUGGESTED
READING
AUG 24 MON 1 Introduction to the course
26 WED 2 CONCRETE
What is it?, mixing, admixtures, placement
50-76
28 FRI 3 Forms, curing, strength tests, reinforcing
31 MON 4 On the job, raised slabs, prestressed, precast shapes
SEP 2 WED 5 SITE WORK
Soil, loading, modification, foundations, retaining walls
22-46
4 FRI 6 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
9 WED 7 MASONRY
What is it?, mortar, block masonry/reinforcing, brick, stone, other
80-106
11 FRI 8 WOOD
Its importance, classifications, trees, growth and structure
154-155
14 MON 9 Lumber milling and drying, sizes, defects, grades, treating 155-168
16 WED 10 Beams, framing, roofs, trusses, plywood, other board products 169-182
18 FRI 11 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
21 MON 12 METALS
Their importance, ores, iron, steel, aluminum, lead, other metals, galvanic action
110-126
134-150
23 WED 13 Forming processes, welds, machining processes 131-132
25 FRI 14 Structural shapes, connections, frames, trusses, open web, light gauge 126-134
28 MON 15 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
30 WED 16 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Information resources, codes, construction documents
2-18
OCT 3 SAT
** INTERIM EXAM **
5 MON 17 PLASTICS
What are they?, types, production processes, products
183-190
7 WED 18 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
9 FRI 19 SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION
Special rooms, seismic, pools, prefabrication
366-373
12 MON 20 SPECIALTIES
Fireplaces, signs, shading devices, other
344-359
14 WED 21 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project.
16 FRI 22 GLASS
What is it?, types, insulating glass, window walls, curtain walls. Last day to drop the course.
265-282
19 MON 23 DOORS AND WINDOWS
Types of doors and windows, parts, hardware, code requirements, materials
236-264
21 WED 24 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
23 FRI 25 FURNISHINGS
Furniture, storage systems, floor and window coverings, fabrics, artwork
368-373
26 MON 26 EQUIPMENT
Kitchen appliances, cabinets and countertops, other equipment
350-355
28 WED 27 THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION
Heat transfer, solar heating systems, insulation
194-201
30 FRI 28 Heat loss/gain, flashing, roofing, 201-233
NOV 2 MON 29 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
4 WED 30 CONVEYING SYSTEMS
Elevators, escalators, ramps, walks, hoists and cranes
390-401
6 FRI 31 PLASTER AND DRYWALL
Plaster, lath, applications, stucco, drywall
286-298
9 MON 32 Self-check quiz; Building Construction Project
14 SAT
** INTERIM EXAM ** Submit construction project
16 MON 33 FLOORING
Flooring stone, wood, tile, tilesetting, terrazzo, resilient, carpet
298-307,
316-323
18 WED 34 ACOUSTICS
Sound, reduction factors/systems, materials, devices, space design
307-316
20 FRI 35 PAINTS AND CLEAR COATINGS
Composition, special purpose paints, stains, finishes, applications, maintenance
324-340
23 MON 36 PLUMBING
Supply and distribution systems, fittings, materials, pipe sizes, fixtures
405-425
25 WED 37 Drainage systems, fittings, pipe sizes, materials, disposal
30 MON 38 HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING (COOLING)
Central heating, space heating, equipment, air conditioning
425-432
DEC 2 WED 39 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
Electricity basics, systems, outlets, switches, grounding, conductors
436-460
4 FRI 40 Wiring plan symbols and design
7 MON 41 Electrical schedules
9 WED 42 Electrical load computations
12 SAT
** FINAL EXAM ** Submit completed electrical plan by 12/15

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